While historic Carmichael Auditorium was under renovation, the women's team played the 2008–09 season at the Dean Smith Center to the south of campus. The final game at the old Carmichael was an 82–51 rout of local rivals Duke in front of a sell-out 8,010 attendance, completing an unbeaten home and conference season.[2] Upon reopening, the building's name was changed to Carmichael Arena.

The Tar Heels finished the season 29–7, 16–2 in ACC play to finish tied for the regular season conference championship with Virginia. As the No. 2 seed in the ACC Tournament, they advanced to the semifinals before ultimately losing to Duke. They received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament as the No. 1 seed in the Midwest region, where they advanced to the Sweet Sixteen before losing to Auburn.

UNC graduate LaToya Pringle Sanders helped Washington to the 2019 WNBA Championship on Thursday. Sanders was in the starting lineup as the Mystics beat the Connecticut Sun 89-78. She is the fourth Tar Heel to win a WNBA title, following Nikki Teasley (Los Angeles, 2002), Camille Little (Seattle, 2010) and Erlana Larkins (Indiana, 2012). (GoHeels.com)
Bryce Thompson and Kerwin Walton could be fighting over the same scholarship. Walton visited UNC last weekend and will head to Miami and Cal next. Thompson is done with visits, and Kansas and Oklahoma may be difficult to beat. Donovan Johnson fits UNC's needs on the wing, and his visit to Chapel Hill this weekend could steer him away from Arizona. (Rivals.com)
“There is always tremendous excitement surrounding ACC Basketball, and that’s no different as we look ahead to the 2019-20 season,” said ACC Commissioner John Swofford. “The league is coming off its third national championship in the last five seasons, and the collective success by our programs is second-to-none. In addition to the anticipation for the season to begin, this year also marks the debut of ACC Basketball on ACC Network which will provide our fans with even more opportunities to follow all of our programs.”

After most schools decided to disband their J.V. squads, North Carolina's athletic department opted to keep the team so that non-scholarship students were given the chance to play basketball for UNC. North Carolina also uses their J.V. team as a way for varsity assistant coaches to gain experience as head coaches, such as the current coach, Hubert Davis. Roy Williams was a J.V. coach for eight years before he was hired at Kansas.
In Williams' first season, the Tar Heels finished 19–11 and were ranked in a final media poll for the first time in three years. They returned to the NCAA tournament and were ousted in the second round by Texas. The following year, the Tar Heels won their fourth NCAA title and Williams' first as a head coach.[39] After winning the championship, Williams lost his top seven scorers, but the 2005–06 season saw the arrival of freshman Tyler Hansbrough and Williams was named Coach of the Year. The Tar Heels swept the ACC regular season and tournament titles in 2007 and 2008. The 2008 ACC Tournament was the first time North Carolina has ever won the ACC Tournament without defeating at least one in-state rival during the tournament.[40] North Carolina lost in the national semifinals of the 2008 NCAA tournament to Williams' former program Kansas.
The Tar Heels finished the season 29–7, 16–2 in ACC play to finish tied for the regular season conference championship with Virginia. As the No. 2 seed in the ACC Tournament, they advanced to the semifinals before ultimately losing to Duke. They received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament as the No. 1 seed in the Midwest region, where they advanced to the Sweet Sixteen before losing to Auburn.
In 1921, the school joined the Southern Conference.[23] Overall, the Tar Heels played 32 seasons in the Southern Conference from 1921 to 1953. During that period they won 304 games and lost 111 for a winning percentage of 73.3%. The Tar Heels won the Southern Conference regular season 9 times and the Southern Conference Tournament Championship 8 times.
Kerwin Walton, the 6-foot-5 shooting guard from Hopkins (MN), visits North Carolina this weekend for his second official visit. Walton took his first official visit to Arizona last month. Paolo Banchero, the 6-foot-9 forward from O’Dea (WA), visits Tennessee for his fourth official visit. Banchero, who said he will remain in the class of 2021, visited UNC in September. (Zag's Blog)
×