Defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo singles out safety Juan Thornhill and lineman Khalen Saunders, the Chiefs' two top defensive draft picks, as players he was particularly eager to see play in Saturday night's preseason opener against the Bengals at Arrowhead Stadium. "I'm really looking more for how cohesive a unit we can be," Spagnuolo said. "To me, communication and working together as a unit . . . That's as important as anything. If we don't get that squared away in the first game, it's going to be a long season."
Smith unexpectedly retired before the start of practice for the 1997–98 season. He was succeeded by Bill Guthridge, who had been an assistant coach at the school for 30 years, the last 25 as Smith's top assistant. During Guthridge's three seasons as head coach he posted an 80–28 record, making him tied for the then-NCAA record for most wins by a coach after three seasons.[36] The Tar Heels reached the NCAA Final Four twice, in the 1998 tournament and again in the 2000 tournament. North Carolina reached the Final Four in 2000 as an 8-seed, their lowest seeding in a Final Four appearance.[37]

In 2017-18, the Tar Heels were ranked at #9 in the Coaches poll. Forwards Isaiah Hicks, Kennedy Meeks, Tony Bradley, and Justin Jackson had left, while the team recruited Cameron Johnson. This season, the team did not earn the ACC regular season or postseason title. However, the Heels earned a #2 seed in the West of the NCAA tournament. The Tar Heels ended the season with a 26-11 record after being eliminated by Texas A&M in the round of 32 in the NCAA Tournament.

UNC graduate LaToya Pringle Sanders helped Washington to the 2019 WNBA Championship on Thursday. Sanders was in the starting lineup as the Mystics beat the Connecticut Sun 89-78. She is the fourth Tar Heel to win a WNBA title, following Nikki Teasley (Los Angeles, 2002), Camille Little (Seattle, 2010) and Erlana Larkins (Indiana, 2012). (GoHeels.com)
Courtney Banghart Live, the official radio show of the North Carolina women's basketball program, debuts Monday at noon the Carolina Club. Banghart will join host Matt Krause, the radio play-by-play voice of UNC women's basketball, for the 30-minute show. The duo will discuss the latest news and notes around the program, as well as preview games. (GoHeels.com)

Now healthy and ready to go, Ryan McAdoo is poised to make a positive impact for the Tar Heels this season. Along with meeting expectations set forth by the team and coaching staff, he has his own goals to be the best he can be and make an impact to help UNC this season. As fate would have it, McAdoo, No. 35 will again suit up for the Tar Heels. (GoHeels.com)
After most schools decided to disband their J.V. squads, North Carolina's athletic department opted to keep the team so that non-scholarship students were given the chance to play basketball for UNC. North Carolina also uses their J.V. team as a way for varsity assistant coaches to gain experience as head coaches, such as the current coach, Hubert Davis. Roy Williams was a J.V. coach for eight years before he was hired at Kansas.
Carolina has played 160 games in the NCAA tournament. The Tar Heels have appeared in the NCAA Tournament Championship Game 11 times, and have been in a record 20 NCAA Tournament Final Fours.[10] The Tar Heels have made it into the NCAA tournament 50 times (second-most all-time),[11][12] and have amassed 123 victories (second most all-time).[11][12] North Carolina also won the National Invitation Tournament in 1971,[3] and appeared in two NIT Finals with six appearances in the NIT Tournament.[3] Additionally, the team has been the number one seed in the NCAA Tournament 17 times, the latest being in 2019 (most #1 seeds all-time).
After wrapping up practice on Wednesday afternoon, players from the North Carolina women's basketball team shifted their attention to preparing for Halloween. The team headed to UNC Children's Hospital, where they helped kids get ready to leave being patients behind for a day and instead become Harry Potter, Captain America or Wonder Woman. (GoHeels.com)
In 1953, North Carolina split from the Southern Conference and became a founding member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.[28] The Tar Heels won their first NCAA Championship in 1957 under fifth year head coach Frank McGuire, who led an undefeated 32-0 squad dominated by Lennie Rosenbluth and several other transplants from the New York City area to a 54-53 triple overtime victory over Wilt Chamberlain's Kansas Jayhawks. C.D. Chesley, a Washington, D.C. television producer, piped the 1957 championship game in Kansas City to a hastily created network of five stations across North Carolina—the ancestor to the current syndicated ACC football and basketball package from Raycom Sports—which helped prove pivotal in basketball becoming a craze in the state.[29] The title game was the only triple overtime final game in championship history,[30] which followed a triple overtime North Carolina defeat of Michigan State 74-70 the previous night.
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The WNBA season wraps up tonight with a decisive game five in the finals between the Washington Mystics and Connecticut Sun. One Tar Heel will feature prominently. LaToya Sanders is in her seventh WNBA season and her fourth with the Mystics. She’s started every game for Washington this season, as they finished with the best record in the league. (Tar Heel Blog)

Right now, Roy Williams says he’s comfortable with an eight-man rotation, and because of that, Leaky Black will be one of two players in crossover roles. Within UNC's system, the point guard is separate while the two wings and two big men each have similar responsibilities. Black will be called on to understand both the point guard and wing spots. (Heels Maven)


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