The Tar Heels own several notable streaks in the history of college basketball. They appeared in either the NCAA Tournament or National Invitation Tournament (NIT) every year from 1967 to 2001. This includes 27 straight appearances in the NCAA tourney from 1975 (the first year that competition allowed more than one team from a conference to get a guaranteed bid) to 2001—the longest such streak in tournament history until it was broken by Kansas in March 2017. The Tar Heels also notched 37 straight winning seasons from 1964 to 2001, the third-longest such streak in NCAA history, behind UCLA's streak of 54 consecutive winning seasons from 1948 to 2001, and Syracuse's currently active streak of 46 seasons from 1971 to date. They also finished .500 or better for 39 years in a row from 1962 (Dean Smith's second year) to 2001, the third-longest such streak in NCAA history, behind Kentucky's streak of 61 consecutive seasons from 1926 to 1988 (the Wildcats were barred from playing in 1952–53 due to NCAA violations) and UCLA's 54-season streak.
In 1953, North Carolina split from the Southern Conference and became a founding member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.[28] The Tar Heels won their first NCAA Championship in 1957 under fifth year head coach Frank McGuire, who led an undefeated 32-0 squad dominated by Lennie Rosenbluth and several other transplants from the New York City area to a 54-53 triple overtime victory over Wilt Chamberlain's Kansas Jayhawks. C.D. Chesley, a Washington, D.C. television producer, piped the 1957 championship game in Kansas City to a hastily created network of five stations across North Carolina—the ancestor to the current syndicated ACC football and basketball package from Raycom Sports—which helped prove pivotal in basketball becoming a craze in the state.[29] The title game was the only triple overtime final game in championship history,[30] which followed a triple overtime North Carolina defeat of Michigan State 74-70 the previous night.
Despite the turnaround from the year before and the NIT appearance, at the end of the season Matt Doherty was replaced as head coach by Roy Williams. Williams had served as an assistant to Smith for 11 years before leaving to spend the first 15 years of his Hall of Fame head coaching career leading Kansas to 9 conference regular season championships and four Final Fours before Smith convinced him to return home. It was hoped that Williams would restore a measure of stability to the program. Williams was UNC's third coach in six years. The two previous to Guthridge (McGuire and Smith) had covered a 45-year period.
Cole Anthony’s reaction to all his preseason hype: a shrug. “At the end of the day, from what the projections are saying, I feel I can do more than that,” he said. “I don’t want to just be first team All-ACC. I want to be Player of the Year.” Anthony walks the talk. The former Archbishop Molloy High School star is frequently in the gym late getting extra shots up. (New York Post)

Ziaire Williams on UNC: "As far as culture and atmosphere, just the city as a whole, they have everything. The fans are amazing, great support system and of course Roy Williams. He’s a Hall of Fame coach, arguably one of the best to ever do it. Every time I go there it has always been fun. I don’t have a timetable. I don’t want to feel pressured by a certain date." (247 Sports)


At the 2:47 mark in the first quarter, when Jazz center Tony Bradley checked into Sunday's game against the Clippers in Los Angeles, it felt like a big moment. No, it wasn’t his NBA debut. But it did kind of feel like it. For the first time, the still-young center was going to play actual meaningful NBA minutes. This wasn’t mop-up time at the end of a rout. (KSL Sports)
From the Tar Heels' first season in 1910–11 through the 2018–19 season, the program has amassed a .739 all-time winning percentage (second highest all-time), winning 2,261 games and losing 799 games in 109 seasons.[6][7][8] The Tar Heels also have the most consecutive 20-win seasons with 31 seasons from the 1970–71 season through the 2000–2001 season.[9] On March 2, 2010, North Carolina became the second college basketball program to reach 2,000 wins in its history. The Tar Heels are currently ranked 3rd all time in wins trailing Kentucky by 34 games and Kansas by 13 games. The Tar Heels are one of only four Division I Men's Basketball programs to have ever achieved 2,000 victories. Kentucky, Kansas, and Duke are the other three. North Carolina has averaged more wins per season played than any other program in college basketball.
For a player to have her jersey honored and hung in the Carmichael Auditorium rafters, she must have been a first-team All-American, been a member of an Olympic team as an undergraduate, or been selected by the coaches as Most Valuable Player of a national championship team. For retiring a jersey, a player must be named national player of the year.[3]
The Atlanta Tipoff Club announced Monday the 50 men's college basketball players to watch during the season-long competition for the 2020 Naismith Trophy Men's Player of the Year honor. University of North Carolina freshman point guard Cole Anthony is on the list. The Naismith Trophy will be awarded during the Final Four in Atlanta on April 5, 2020. (GoHeels.com)
After more than three decades, University of North Carolina women's basketball coach Sylvia Hatchell has resigned from leading the celebrated program. Her resignation followed an external review that found she made "racially insensitive" remarks, exercised "undue influence" on athletes to play while injured and lacked a connection with her players.
For the second year in a row, North Carolina center Janelle Bailey has been named to the Preseason All-Atlantic Coast Conference Women's Basketball Team. She's one of 10 standouts named to the 2019-20 squad, announced Wednesday. Bailey, from Charlotte, N.C., is coming off a sophomore season in which she averaged 16.7 points and 8.7 rebounds. (GoHeels.com)
The 2010–2011 Tar Heels, with the addition of Harrison Barnes, Kendall Marshall, and Reggie Bullock, eighth in the preseason polls, struggled out the gates, starting with a 2-2 record, the worst start since the 2001–02 season. After losses to Illinois and Texas, the Tar Heels fell out of the rankings. The losses of senior Will Graves, to dismissal, and Larry Drew II, to transfer and also the unexpected off-season transfers of David and Travis Wear did not help matters. However, the Tar Heels improved greatly during the conference season, finishing first in the ACC regular season with a 14-2 record. Williams was named Conference Coach of the Year for his efforts of getting his team to work through the adversity to finish strong in the regular season.[44] Also during the season, the term Tar Heel Blue Steel was coined, referencing the Tar Heel men's basketball walk-ons. The term was started by one of the players, Stewart Cooper, in hopes that it would be a replacement for "walk-ons" and other less catchy names and soon enough Roy Williams caught on, as well as the rest of the Tar Heel Nation. North Carolina lost to Duke in the ACC Tournament Finals and made a significant run in the NCAA Tournament until they were eliminated in the Elite Eight by Kentucky, finishing with a 29-8 record.[45]

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North Carolina’s championship aspirations begin and end with Cole Anthony. The blue-chip freshman has the talent to go first overall in next year’s NBA draft. Anthony is one of the best players in the country. North Carolina has thrived the last few years by having a number of impressive contributors. This season might look more like a one-man show. (The Ringer)
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