Cole Anthony’s reaction to all his preseason hype: a shrug. “At the end of the day, from what the projections are saying, I feel I can do more than that,” he said. “I don’t want to just be first team All-ACC. I want to be Player of the Year.” Anthony walks the talk. The former Archbishop Molloy High School star is frequently in the gym late getting extra shots up. (New York Post)

The team played in the Bynum Gymnasium, a venue known for its unusual running track suspended above the court.[24] Play moved to the Tin Can during the 1924 season, until the team's relocation to the Woollen Gymnasium in 1938.[25][26] Rudimentarily built of steel, attempts to heat the Tin Can during early season at first failed, with ice often forming inside:
North Carolina junior Janelle Bailey had been selected as one of 20 top college centers on the 2020 Lisa Leslie Award Watch List. It's the second year in a row that Bailey, a 6-4 center from Charlotte, N.C., has been part of the watch list. Bailey recently was voted to the 2019-20 Preseason All-Atlantic Coast Conference team, also for the second year in a row. (GoHeels.com)
After more than three decades, University of North Carolina women's basketball coach Sylvia Hatchell has resigned from leading the celebrated program. Her resignation followed an external review that found she made "racially insensitive" remarks, exercised "undue influence" on athletes to play while injured and lacked a connection with her players.
The North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball program is the intercollegiate men's basketball team of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Tar Heels have won seven NCAA men's college national championships (1924, 1957, 1982, 1993, 2005, 2009, and 2017).[2] North Carolina's six NCAA Tournament Championships are third-most all-time, behind University of California, Los Angeles(11) and University of Kentucky(8). They have also won 18 Atlantic Coast Conference tournament titles,[3] 32 Atlantic Coast Conference regular season titles,[4] and an Atlantic Coast Conference record 20 outright Regular Season Championships.[4] The program has produced many notable players who went on to play in the NBA, including three of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History: Billy Cunningham, Michael Jordan and James Worthy. Many Tar Heel assistant coaches have gone on to become head coaches elsewhere.[5]
The 2011–2012 Tar Heels finished the regular season with a final record of 32-6, including a 14–2 record in ACC regular season play which allowed the team to win the conference regular season championship outright. The team fell to Florida State in the championship game of the 2012 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament. The team was a #1 seed in the Midwest Regional of the 2012 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament; the team reached the Elite Eight and was defeated by Kansas 80-67. This defeat was the second time UNC lost to Kansas in the NCAA Tournament with Roy Williams as UNC head coach. He previously coached Kansas from 1988 to 2003. The loss to Kansas was also UNC's second straight loss in the Elite Eight, after losing to Kentucky the year before. Kansas later fell to Kentucky 67-59 in the National Championship Game. Before the Kansas game, the Tar Heels won their previous three games in the NCAA Tournament by an average of 13.7 points. In the second-round game versus Creighton, starting UNC point guard Kendall Marshall broke his right wrist with 10:56 remaining[46] in the second half with UNC leading 66-50. Marshall continued to play by dribbling primarily with his left hand, including getting fouled on a drive to the basket with 7:09 left in the second half. He left the game against Creighton with two minutes left with UNC leading 85-69. Williams announced Kendall Marshall's injury at the Creighton post-game press conference.[47] Kendall Marshall did not play in UNC's two following games in the NCAA Tournament, a 73-65 overtime win over Ohio in the Sweet 16 and the aforementioned 67-80 loss to Kansas in the Elite Eight.
The 2010–2011 Tar Heels, with the addition of Harrison Barnes, Kendall Marshall, and Reggie Bullock, eighth in the preseason polls, struggled out the gates, starting with a 2-2 record, the worst start since the 2001–02 season. After losses to Illinois and Texas, the Tar Heels fell out of the rankings. The losses of senior Will Graves, to dismissal, and Larry Drew II, to transfer and also the unexpected off-season transfers of David and Travis Wear did not help matters. However, the Tar Heels improved greatly during the conference season, finishing first in the ACC regular season with a 14-2 record. Williams was named Conference Coach of the Year for his efforts of getting his team to work through the adversity to finish strong in the regular season.[44] Also during the season, the term Tar Heel Blue Steel was coined, referencing the Tar Heel men's basketball walk-ons. The term was started by one of the players, Stewart Cooper, in hopes that it would be a replacement for "walk-ons" and other less catchy names and soon enough Roy Williams caught on, as well as the rest of the Tar Heel Nation. North Carolina lost to Duke in the ACC Tournament Finals and made a significant run in the NCAA Tournament until they were eliminated in the Elite Eight by Kentucky, finishing with a 29-8 record.[45]
The 1922 and 1924 teams also included center and guard Cartwright Carmichael and guard Monk McDonald, with the Tar Heels led by forward Jack Cobb from 1924-26. Carmichael was the first Tar Heel to be selected All-American in any sport in 1923, and was again selected in 1924. Cobb was selected All-American in 1924, 1925, and 1926, and was player of the year in 1926. McDonald coached the 1925 team, with Bunn Hackney replacing him at guard.
After most schools decided to disband their J.V. squads, North Carolina's athletic department opted to keep the team so that non-scholarship students were given the chance to play basketball for UNC. North Carolina also uses their J.V. team as a way for varsity assistant coaches to gain experience as head coaches, such as the current coach, Hubert Davis. Roy Williams was a J.V. coach for eight years before he was hired at Kansas.
The 1922 Tar Heels won the SoCon, and the 1924 Tar Heels squad went 26–0, and was retroactively awarded a 'national championship' by the Helms Athletic Foundation in 1943 and later by the Premo-Porretta Power Poll.[2][27] The Tar Heels also won the 1925 and 1926 SoCon titles, three in a row and four in five seasons. Their fast style of play and stingy defense earned these teams the nickname "White Phantoms", used as an alternative nickname for the Tar Heels into the 1940s.
For a player to have her jersey honored and hung in the Carmichael Auditorium rafters, she must have been a first-team All-American, been a member of an Olympic team as an undergraduate, or been selected by the coaches as Most Valuable Player of a national championship team. For retiring a jersey, a player must be named national player of the year.[3]
Carolina has played 160 games in the NCAA tournament. The Tar Heels have appeared in the NCAA Tournament Championship Game 11 times, and have been in a record 20 NCAA Tournament Final Fours.[10] The Tar Heels have made it into the NCAA tournament 50 times (second-most all-time),[11][12] and have amassed 123 victories (second most all-time).[11][12] North Carolina also won the National Invitation Tournament in 1971,[3] and appeared in two NIT Finals with six appearances in the NIT Tournament.[3] Additionally, the team has been the number one seed in the NCAA Tournament 17 times, the latest being in 2019 (most #1 seeds all-time).
Kerwin Walton, the 6-foot-5 shooting guard from Hopkins (MN), visits North Carolina this weekend for his second official visit. Walton took his first official visit to Arizona last month. Paolo Banchero, the 6-foot-9 forward from O’Dea (WA), visits Tennessee for his fourth official visit. Banchero, who said he will remain in the class of 2021, visited UNC in September. (Zag's Blog)
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